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Introduction to apologetics, continued:

What do you hope to gain from this study of apologetics?

  • Internal motivations
    • Answer questions you have yourself – Mark 9:24
    • Stronger personal faith – know why you believe – Luke 17:5; Colossians 2:6-7
    • Defend your own faith against attacks – II Timothy 3:13-15
  • External motivations
    • Better able to answer questions of seekers (children, friends, coworkers) – Ephesians 4:11-14
    • Persuade those in error – but to what end? Philippians 1:15-17
    • “Win” an internet debate – Matthew 7:6
    • Defeat opposition – to what end? Matthew 6:2, 5, 16
    • Plant a seed – I Corinthians 3:6; Mark 4:31-32; Luke 8:11-15; 13:6-9

Purpose in apologetics

  • I Peter 3:15 – Ready to make a defense – but in what way?
    • I Peter 3:8-9, 15 – our attitudes
    • I Peter 3:11 – seek peace
    • I Peter 3:12-14 – fearless
    • I Peter 3:16 – our conduct
  • I Peter 3:18 – Christ’s suffering led me to our sanctification.
    • What must our willingness to suffer for Christ do for others?

Final thoughts

  • Luke 12:11-12
    • Jesus told his disciples not to prepare beforehand what they would say, because the Holy Spirit would teach them in that very hour what they should say.
    • That promise was not made to us, but we can learn from it.
  • Luke 21:12-15
    • Similar instructions, promise worded differently. He would give them wisdom and utterance no opponent could refute.
    • Their persecution would lead to an opportunity for testimony.

Faith and science

What is faith?

  • Personal conviction that something is true when the believer has no first-hand knowledge of it.
  • Romans 8:24
  • II Corinthians 5:7
  • Hebrews 11:1

How do we develop faith?

  • Discuss
    • Testimony
    • Observation of evidence (as opposed to direct observation)
      • Secondary, tertiary, etc.
    • Reasoning
  • Luke 24; John 20:25-31

What are some everyday things we believe or take for granted?

What is science?

  • Testing of theory against evidence

How does science work?

For further study, see also:

Questions or comments? Join our Discord server for further study.


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Introduction

  • Genesis 12:1-3, 11-12 – God’s promises to Abraham.

God’s promises

  • Genesis 12:1-7

I will make you a great nation.

  • Genesis 21:5
  • Exodus 1:7-9, 20
  • Deuteronomy 26:5
  • Genesis 14:13 – “Abram the Hebrew”
  • Romans 4:18-22
  • FULFILLED! Abraham became the father of the Hebrew nation.

To your descendants I will give this land.

  • Joshua 1:1-6; 21:43-45
  • Nehemiah 9:7-8
  • FULFILLED! The nation lived in the land of promise.

In you all the families of the earth will be blessed.

  • Matthew 1:1, 2-16; 3:8-9
  • Acts 3:13-15, 19, 25-26
  • FULFILLED! Abraham’s descendant, Jesus, became the Savior of the world.

Abraham’s exemplary faith

  • Hebrews 11:8-10, 13-19
  • John 8:31-33, 37-47
  • Romans 4:9-17, 23-24
  • Romans 9:6-8
  • Galatians 3:6-9, 26-29

For further study, see also:

Questions or comments? Join our Discord server for further study.


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Introduction

  • Acts 8:1-3 – The church was the people. Not a building!
  • Romans 16:5
  • Acts 20:17, 28-30 – The trouble to come was that people would be drawn away. This was spiritual work to guard the people.

The word “church”

  • The word translated church in the New Testament simply means, “a called out group” or “assembly.” The word itself does not have a spiritual connotation.
  • Acts 19:32 – The word “assembly” here is ekklesia, often translated “church.”

Universal sense (all saved people everywhere)

  • Ephesians 5:22-28 – Christ died to save the church.
  • Ephesians 4:4 – There is one body (one church) because there is one savior.
  • Matthew 16:16-19 – Jesus was establishing a group of people who were saved.
  • Acts 2:38
  • Hebrews 12:22-23 – The people’s names are written in heaven.
  • Luke 10:20

Local sense (saved people working together as a congregation)

  • Romans 16:16
  • I Corinthians 1:2

The church does not save; it is the saved.

  • Acts 4:12 – Jesus is the savior – not the church!

Don’t think of the “church of Christ” as a denomination with a creed.

  • “Church of Christ” is a description – not a name.
  • Churches are described with many names in the New Testament:
    • Romans 16:16
    • I Corinthians 11:16
    • I Thessalonians 2:14
    • I Corinthians 14:30
    • Acts 11:22
    • Romans 16:1
    • I Corinthians 1:2
    • I Thessalonians 1:1
  • Acts 8:12

There should not be such a thing as “church of Christ” doctrine.

  • There is only the doctrine of God.

Let’s just objectively seek the truth!

For further study, see also:

Questions or comments? Join our Discord server for further study.


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Introduction

  • Matthew 26:26-29 – Some take this literally. This is a metaphor. It was figuratively his body and blood.

Why does God use figurative language?

  • Figures make language more vivid, interesting, memorable, and powerful.
  • I Peter 5:8
  • II Peter 2:21-22
  • How about the parable of the prodigal son (Luke 15)?
  • The basic message is that we should rejoice when sinners repent, but by presenting that as a parable, Jesus turns it into a memorable story.

When should we take a word or phrase figuratively?

  • A good rule of thumb is to understand a passage literally unless there is a good reason to believe otherwise:
    • When it is said to be figurative.
      • John 2:18-21
      • Ephesians 6:17
      • Isaiah 9:2
    • When a literal understanding contradicts another passage.
      • Mark 1:5; Luke 7:29-30 – Not absolutely all people came out to obey Jesus.
    • When it matches a pattern of figurative language in other passages.
      • John 6:27; I John 3:18; I Peter 3:3 – Not-but passages.
    • When a literal understanding contradicts known facts or common sense.
      • John 3:3

When should we NOT take a word or phrase figuratively?

  • When a literal understanding simply contradicts our beliefs.
    • I Corinthians 7:1

For further study, see also:

Questions or comments? Join our Discord server for further study.


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Age of the earth

  • Why does the age of the earth matter?
  • Dr. Rogers: Does the Hebrew word yom endorse an old earth?
    • The word can be used either literally or figuratively.
      • Figurative: Genesis 2:4, 17
      • Literal in cases where it is used with the number of a day (first day, second day, etc.).
  • Other references to Creation
    • Exodus 20:11
    • Mark 10:6
  • Could the God described in the Bible create the earth in 6, 24-hour days?
  • Could the God described in the Bible create the earth across billions of years?
  • Based on the evidence available, which do you believe?
  • Age of the earth estimations from Biblical records
    • Matthew’s genealogy of Jesus
      • Tracing Jesus’ lineage through Joseph
      • Establishes a paternal link to David
        • Legal right to inherit throne
      • Age of earth: 7,307 years
      • Date of creation: 5284 BC
    • Luke’s genealogy of Jesus
      • Traces Jesus’ lineage through Mary
      • Establishes a blood link to David
        • Blood right to inherit throne
      • Age of earth: 8,596 years
      • Date of creation: 6573 BC
  • Underlying assumptions of this Biblical timeline
    • The “days” of creation were literal, 24-hour days.
    • No gaps in genealogies presented in the Biblical record.
    • Where we don’t have the age of the father at the birth of the next person in a lineage, this timeline uses an “average lifespan” for that timespan.
    • Assuming there are no gaps in the genealogies presented in the Bible, this makes the timeline longer than actual.

For further study, see also:

Questions or comments? Join our Discord server for further study.


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