Mark, Part 21

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By Jesse Jenkins

Benchley, July 13, 2014

 

  • Mark 16:14-20
  • Mark 16:17-18 – See also Hebrews 2:1-4. The context here indicates that the sense is that they would be protected from certain things, including poisonous animals. It was not instructing them to go out and handle snakes or drink poison to demonstrate their faith. It covered situations like Acts 28:3-5.
  • Review of the miracles of Jesus as recorded in Mark. At least 26 different occasions are recorded in which Jesus performed miracles.

 

By Jesse Jenkins and Kevin Scott
Benchley, July 6, 2014
[Editor’s note:  This is an unusual lesson in that it is a study of Mark 15:34 from two different perspectives.  As explained in the audio file, two of the elders at Benchley (Jesse Jenkins and Kevin Scott) take different views on this passage, so each man gave a short talk explaining his perspective.  Like these two men say, we encourage you to study the passage, listen to their reasoning, and decide for yourself what you believe the passage is saying. – MRW]
  • Jesse Jenkins:
    • Mark 15:34
    • Is this statement to be taken literally or as hyperbole?
    • This is hyperbole because of other statements Jesus made.
      • John 8:28-29
      • Luke 23:47-48 – This cry caused faith in those that heard it.
    • God has never forsaken one who does His will.
      • Isaiah 59:1-2 – Only sin separates us from God.
      • Ezekiel 18:2-4
      • Psalms 9:10 – Jesus was certainly seeking God!
    • Jesus was made to be a sin offering to bear away our sins.  II Corinthians 5:21; I Peter 2:23
    • Jesus plainly said that God would be with Him and not leave Him alone.  John 8:29; 16:32
    • Jesus’ last words – “Father, unto thy hand I commend my Spirit.”
    • Psalm 22:1
  • Kevin Scott
    • This is literal because the context is not figurative.  Psalm 22 is also literal.  David felt that he had literally been forsaken by God and then presented reasons why.
    • Just like the scapegoat had to leave the congregation to take away sin, Jesus had to separate from God to take away our sin.
    • II Corinthians 5:14-15 – Jesus experienced death for all of us.  Jesus did not taste physical death for us (because we must all physically die).  He tasted spiritual death for us so that we would not have to.
    • Matthew 18:34-35
    • Romans 6:3-4
    • John 8:28-29 – See John 8:16.  What does it mean to be separated? What does it mean to be alone?
    • Mark 16:14 – The closest disciples did not believe the reports of the resurrection.  Jesus quoting Psalm 22 on the cross was not enough to produce faith in them.

Mark, Part 20

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By Jesse Jenkins

Benchley, July 6, 2014

  • Mark 15:34-16:16
  • Mark 15:46 – With the tomb being hewn out of solid rock, there was no way for anyone to sneak the body of Jesus out of some back way.  In other accounts (Matthew 27:61-66), we learn that the Romans secured the tomb with a guard.
  • Mark 16:1-8 – Compare Matthew 28:1-10; John 20:17; Luke 24:1-12.  The people touched Jesus after His resurrection, but Jesus told them not to cling to Him because He still had to ascend to Heaven.  Luke’s account firmly puts Jesus’ resurrection on the first day of the week.
  • Mark 16:14 – Jesus expected the disciples to believe in the testimony of others, which is what He expects of us today.
  • Mark 16:16 – Some dispute this verse to get away from the baptism requirement, but other verses (such as Acts 2:38-40) clearly show that baptism is required.  See also Matthew 28:18-20.  If you do not believe, you cannot be baptized in the name of Jesus, so not believing implies not being baptized, which ends in condemnation.

Mark, Part 19

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By Jesse Jenkins

Benchley, June 29, 2014

 

  • Mark 15:1-34
  • Mark 15:1 – The Jews wanted Jesus to be a public spectacle, thus the plan to seek His crucifixion.
  • Mark 15:10 – Pilate knew that the leaders of the Jews envied Jesus’ power and influence.
  • Mark 15:15 – The Jewish law restricted punishment to a maximum of 40 lashes, of which they customarily gave only 39. The Romans had no such restriction, so there is no way to know how many lashes Jesus received here. It is reported that prisoners sometimes died from the scourging itself.
  • Mark 15:21 – See Luke 23:26. Simon carried the aft part of the cross while Jesus carried the fore part.
  • Mark 15:32 – Some have argued there is a contradiction here with Luke 23:39-43. It seems that both of the criminals reviled Jesus, but then one had a change of heart. There is no contradiction. Luke’s account just gives more detail.

 

Mark, Part 18

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By Jesse Jenkins

Benchley, June 15, 2014

 

  • Mark 14:35-72
  • Mark 14:35-42 – Jesus prays in Gethsemane before His betrayal and crucifixion.
  • Mark 14:43-52 – Judas betrays Jesus.
  • Mark 14:53-65 – Jesus is tried and convicted on false charges.
    • Mark 14:58 – Jesus never said, “this temple made with hands.” He spoke of the temple of His body, which they misunderstood. See John 2:19.
  • Mark 14:66-72 – Peter denies Christ.

 

Mark, Part 17

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By Jesse Jenkins

Benchley, June 8, 2014

 

  • Mark 14:12-42
  • Mark 14:12-21 – This is the last Passover feast that the Jews ate with the approval of God. Jesus was about to be crucified and the new law would take effect.
  • Mark 14:22-25 – Jesus institutes the Lord’s Supper.
  • Mark 14:25 – The phrase “the day that” comes from the Greek tes hemeras ekeinas. Variations of this phrase also occur in Matthew 7:22; 8:1; II Timothy 1:18; :8; Matthew 24:36; Mark 13:22; II Timothy 1:12. Jesus is making the point that there was a specific day in which they would eat the Supper. In Acts 20:7, this day is identified – the first day of the week.
  • Mark 14:22-23 – Note that Jesus gave thanks for the bread and fruit of the vine. We should do the same when waiting the table for the Lord’s Supper. This is a simple act, but is often forgotten.
  • Mark 14:26-31 – Jesus prophesies about Peter’s denial.
  • Mark 14:32-42 – Jesus prays in Gethsemane.
  • Mark 14:35 – The phrase “pass by” comes from the Greek para erchomai. See John 14:27. The phrase is also used in Matthew 14:15; Mark 6:48; Luke 18:37; Acts 16:8; 27:9; James 1:10. Jesus was praying that the time would pass quickly and his prayer was answered.

Mark, Part 16

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By Jesse Jenkins

Benchley, June 1, 2014

 

  • Mark 13:24-14:11
  • Mark 13:24-31
    • See Isaiah 13:9-10; 19:6 – This type of language is often used in reference to God coming in judgment – not necessarily the end of the world.
  • Mark 13:31 – See Isaiah 51:6 for usage of a similar prophetic language.
  • The “Comings” of Christ
  • 1. His first coming: Genesis 49:10; John 6:14; Acts 7:52
    2. His presence with His apostles after His ascension: John 14:3, 28
    3. His coming in His kingdom: Mark 9:1; Matthew 16:27-28
    4. His presence with the Christian: Revelation 3:20
    5. His judgment upon certain rich men, James 5:7
    6. His coming in destruction of Jerusalem: Matthew 24, Mark 13; Luke 21
    7. His coming in the person of the Holy Spirit to guide apostles: John 14:18,28
    8. His coming in retribution in the imagery of the Revelation: Revelation 1:7; 2:5,16; 3:3
    9. His coming with reward in the imagery of the Revelation: Revelation 22:7
    10. His final coming: 1 Thessalonians 2:19; 4:15; 2 Thessalonians 2;2: Matthew 25:31; 2 Peter 3:10
  • Mark 14:1-9 – A woman anoints Jesus with oil.
    • Compare John 12:1-8. These may both by the same event.

 

Mark, Part 15

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By Jesse Jenkins

Benchley, May 25, 2014

 

  • Mark 12:38-13:23
  • Mark 12:38-40 – Jesus warns about the pride of the scribes in how they sought out the places of prestige in he synagogues and feasts.
  • Mark 12:41-44 – The widow gives all that she has into the treasury. The question we should ask is, “How should I give?” – not “How much should I give?” It’s not eh amount that impresses the Lord. It’s the disposition with which it is given.
  • Mark 13:1-13 – Jesus prophesies about the destruction of the temple. All these prophecies relate to events preceding the destruction of the Jerusalem.
  • Mark 13:14-23 – Josephus records that no Christians were killed in the destruction of Jerusalem. See also Daniel 9-11.

 

Mark, Part 14

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By Jesse Jenkins

Benchley, May 18, 2014

 

  • Mark 12:1-12 – Parable of the vine-growers
  • Mark 12:13-17 – The Pharisees and Herodians question Jesus about paying taxes to Caesar
  • Mark 12:18-27 – The Sadducees question Jesus about marriage in the afterlife
  • Mark 12:28-34 – The scribes question Jesus about the greatest commandment
  • Mark 12:35-37 – Jesus is more than just the son of David – He is deity.

 

Mark, Part 13

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By Jesse Jenkins

Benchley, May 11, 2014

 

  • Mark 11:15-12:12
  • Mark 11:15-26 – Jesus drives merchants from the temple.
    • Mark 11:20 – This was another of Jesus’ miracles. The fig tree would not be dried up from the roots after such a short time (see Mark 11:13-14) without divine intervention.
    • Mark 11:17 – Jesus was upset about two things: selling animals inside the temple and charging exorbitant prices for those animals. They were taking advantage of those who traveled long distances and had to buy animals on the spot for sacrifices.
  • Mark 11:27-33 – Jesus’ authority is questioned in the temple.
    • Mark 11:29 – See Proverbs 26:4-5.
  • Mark 12:1-12 – Parable of the vine-growers.
    • Mark 12:10-11 – See Psalm 118:22-23.