By David Watson

Benchley, January 31, 2018

  • Misusing figures, continued:
    • Don’t take an unintended lesson from the figure, continued:
      • “Jonah was not dead in the fish; Jesus was not dead in the tomb. He appeared to die but did not actually die.” (Matthew 12:39-40) This contradicts many other passages that plainly say Jesus died. The comparison here is in the timing of the two events. Compare also John 3:14.
      • “If my grown child falls away, I should not seek him out. The father in Luke 15 waited for the son to come home on his own.” (Luke 15:18) This contradicts the parables of the lost sheep and lost coin earlier in the same chapter. Compare Matthew 18:15-17.
      • “One person wins a race. So only one person is going to Heaven.” (I Corinthians 9:24) The context talks about Paul helping others to reach Heaven, so clearly that’s not what the passage means.
      • “Take two people and bind them with a rope. If you cut the rope, both are free. So, if one is free to remarry, the other is, too.” (Romans 7:23) Rope is not in the context. The bond is a legal one from God’s perspective. Rope is a poor analogy.
  • Commentaries
    • Read the Bible first!
      • Matthew 15:3-9
      • Let your first impressions come from the inspired text itself.

Jonah

Posted by mark under Classes

By Jesse Jenkins

Benchley, November 8, 2015

  • II Kings 14:23-25 – Timeline of the book of Jonah.
  • The book of Jonah was written about 780 B.C.
  • Matthew 12:39-41 – Jesus Himself testified to the factuality of the story of Jonah. It is not just a myth or fairytale as some claim.
  • Two main points of the book of Jonah:
    • God is the God of all, not just the Jews.
    • God is anxious to save all, even the Gentiles.
  • Jonah 1:1-17 – This book is full of miracles and acts of God. It is not a miracle that a great storm arose that endangered the ship.  We also know there are creatures in the sea that are large enough to swallow a man.  It is a miracle that Jonah was able to survive in the belly of the fish.
  • Jonah 2 – Jonah recounts his prayer for salvation. God delivers Jonah from the belly of the fish.
  • Jonah 3 – Jonah preaches to Ninevah and the people repented. God repented of the punishment He had planned for the city (Jonah 3:10).
    • See Luke 11:30 – Jonah was a sign to the Ninevites. The Ninevites repented because of what had happened to Jonah.
  • Jonah 4 – Jonah shows his prejudice and becomes angry with God because of the repentance of Ninevah.
  • Lessons from the book:
    • God’s love and mercy for all people.
    • The evil of being narrow-minded and prejudiced.
    • National sin requires national repentance.
    • All that God created is in His control.
    • We can’t run from disobedience.

Redemption

Posted by mark under Sermons

By David Watson

Benchley, January 5, 2014

 

  • What is redemption?
    • Exagorazo [1805] means “ ‘to buy out’ … especially of purchasing a slave with a view to his freedom” (Vine)
    • Lutroo [3084] has a similar meaning: “to release on receipt of ransom” (Vine)
    • Ephesians 1:7,13-14
    • Colossians 1:13-14
    • Hebrews 9:12
  • Steps to redemption
    • Faith – Acts 2:36-37; John 8:24; Hebrews 11:6; Romans 10:17
    • Repentance – Acts 2:38; 17:30; Luke 24:46-47; II Peter 3:9; II Corinthians 7:9-11; Matthew 12:41; Jonah 3:5-10; Matthew 3:1-2
    • Confession – Acts 8:35-39; Romans 10:9-10
    • Baptism – Romans 3:21
      • What does baptism do?
        • Is saves us. Mark 16:16; I Peter 3:21
        • It is for the forgiveness of sins. Acts 2:38
        • It washes away sins. Acts 22:16
        • It makes us partakers of Christ’s death, burial, and resurrection. Romans 6:3-4; Colossians 2:12
        • It adds us into the “body” (the “church,” Colossians 1:18). I Corinthians 12:13
        • It clothes us with Christ. Galatians 3:27
      • Therefore, without baptism
        • We aren’t saved.
        • We do not have forgiveness of sins.
        • Our sins are not washed away.
        • We are not partakers of Christ’s death, burial, and resurrection.
        • We are not added to the “body” (the “church”).
        • We are not clothed with Christ.
      • Baptism is urgent
        • Acts 2:41; 8:36; 16:33; 22:16
    • Growth and service – II Peter 3:18; Hebrews 12:28; Titus 2:11-14; I Peter 1:14-19

 

Jonah, Part 2

Posted by mark under Classes

Jonah

Posted by mark under Classes

By David Watson

Benchley, November 16, 2011

 

People From the Past

Posted by mark under Sermons

By David Watson

Benchley, July 24, 2011

 

Jonah

Posted by mark under Classes

By Jesse Jenkins

Benchley, June 8, 2011

  • The book takes place somewhere around 780 B.C., in the time of Jeroboam II (I Kings 14:25).
  • The story of Jonah is factual and not just an allegory because Jesus refers to it as such in the New Testament (Matthew 12:39-41; Luke 11:29-32.
  • Jeremiah 18:7-10 – God promises to relent from destroying a sinful nation if it repents and turns from evil. This is exactly what happened in the case of Ninevah in Jonah 3.
    • Why did Ninevah react so well to Jonah’s preaching? Luke 11:29-30 shows that Jonah was a sign to the Ninevites. Somehow they knew about Jonah’s plight and it effected them greatly. Historically, the nation of Syria was also a a low point when Jonah did his preaching.
    • The Ninevites showed true repentance by changing their minds and their actions, from the king down to the common man.
  • Jonah 4 – Jonah shows his Jewish bias. He was biased against the Ninevites from the beginning, which is why he didn’t want to go preach to them. He was extremely upset when God did not destroy them for their sins.
  • Application:
    • We must learn God’s compassion for all people.
    • National sin requires national repentance.
    • God is the Creator and all creation is at His disposal.
    • We must obey God if we are to have His blessing.