By David Watson

Benchley, September 16, 2018

  • Creation and people begin to sin (Genesis 1-11)
    • Exodus 20:9 – The Earth was created in 6 days – not eons.
    • Genesis 3:14-19 – Man sins and was cursed.
    • Hebrews 2:14
    • I Corinthians 15:54
    • Genesis 6:17 – God brings a worldwide flood to destroy the corrupt, violent people.
    • God is in charge. Man’s great dilemma is sin.
  • Abraham and 3 promises (Genesis 12-50)
    • Genesis 12:1-7 – God makes three promises to Abraham
      • Descendants to become a great nation
      • Descendants to inherit the land of Canaan
      • Through Abraham all the nations would be blessed
  • Deliverance from Egypt, Law of Moses, Canaan (Exodus, Leviticus, Numbers, Deuteronomy, Joshua)
    • Exodus 1:1-9; 12:37 – The first promise if fulfilled – Israel is a great nation!
    • Joshua 21:43; 23:14 – The second promise if fulfilled – Israel takes the promised land.
  • United and Divided Kingdom (Judges, I & II Samuel, I & II Kings, I & II Chronicles)
    • No righteous kings in Israel. Assyrian captivity after 200 years.
    • A few righteous kings in Judah. Babylonian captivity after 350 years.
    • God sends many prophets to both kingdoms to try to get them to turn back.
  • Captivity, return, and rebuilding (Ezra and Nehemiah)
    • Three waves of deportations followed by three waves of returning exiles.
    • 400 years of silence before the events of the New Testament begin.
  • Jesus and the Good News! (Matthew, Mark, Luke, and John)
    • Acts 3:25-26 – Final promise to Abraham fulfilled in Jesus. Jesus’ earthly parents came through Abraham’s line of descendants and through Him, all mankind would be blessed.
    • Jesus is crucified and buried. On the third day, He is resurrected, appears to many, and then ascends to Heaven where He reigns today.
  • The New Covenant begins (Acts)
    • Acts 1:8
  • The Bible as a whole tells the story of sin, our greatest problem, and how God worked His plan over thousands of years to bring a Savior to the world. Now we can all unite and obey that Savior so that we can glorify God and go to Heaven in the end!

By Jesse Jenkins

Benchley, September 5, 2018

  • Acts 13:16-47
    • Theme: The gospel was to be delivered to the Gentiles. This sermon lays the foundation for that. That foundation is Jesus.
    • Main points:
      • Recounting history of the Israelites (Acts 13:16-47)
      • Jesus brought as the Savior (Acts 13:23)
      • Jesus was crucified and raised from the dead (Acts 13:27-37)
      • Jesus frees all from sin (Acts 13:38-42)
      • Jews see the crowds Paul is gathering and stir up trouble (Acts 13:44-45)
      • Paul and Barnabas turn to the Gentiles to preach the gospel to them (Acts 13:46-47)
    • Verse notes:
      • Acts 13:34 – “Sure blessings of David” are those that came about in Jesus.
      • Acts 13:35 – This is a quote from Psalm 16:10
      • Acts 13:39 – “Believes” here is used in a comprehensive way – a belief that obeys. It’s talking about those who believe Jesus not just those that believe in
      • Acts 13:46 – It was necessary to preach to the Jews first because that was God’s plan for His chosen people. See Ephesians 3:7. Paul preached to everyone.

I Peter, Part 7

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By Jesse Jenkins

Benchley, March 11, 2018

  • I Peter 4:6-17
  • I Peter 4:6 – Because all will be judged by the gospel (both alive and dead), the gospel was preached to everyone. Catholics have a different view on this verse, believing that Jesus was crucified and went to Hell, where He preached to people there. This view is not supported by scripture and is refuted by verses such as II Corinthians 5:10.
  • I Peter 4:8 – Compare Proverbs 10:12.
  • I Peter 4:9 – Hospitality should be done out of love. If you are hospitable and grumble about it, it does you no good.
  • I Peter 4:10 – A steward handles the goods of another. All Christians are stewards of the grace of God. It’s hard to imagine a greater unmerited favor than working for God to save men’s souls.
  • I Peter 4:12 – Don’t be surprised if you have to suffer for your faith but rejoice in it.
  • I Peter 4:17 – This judgment is not the end of the world. Many judgments are described in the Bible:
    • Matthew 24 – Judgment on Israel
    • James 5 – Judgment on the rich man

The Prayers of Cornelius

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By Jesse Jenkins

Benchley, February 25, 2018

  • Acts 10
  • I John 3:22; John 9:31 – God answers prayers of the faithful.
  • Acts 10:4 – Cornelius evidently had a right relationship with God. How was that so? Because he lived righteously under God’s law at the time.
  • Romans 1:26-32 – These were not acceptable to God because they did not respect God’s law. These were all things Cornelius did not do. He respected God’s law.
  • If Cornelius was already acceptable to God, why did he need Peter to come teach him?
    • The same question would apply to God-fearing Jews of the time.
    • Acts 1:8
    • Hebrews 13:10
    • It was a question of God’s timetable. Jews and Gentiles of that time had to hear and respond to the gospel to continue to be acceptable to God. Rejected the gospel would have meant they were no longer in a right relationship with God.

II Corinthians, Part 7

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By Jesse Jenkins

Benchley, March 22, 2017

  • II Corinthians 6:1-18
  • II Corinthians 6:2 – The Holy Spirit here applies this prophecy from Isaiah to the gospel. Now is the time for salvation, not some future time as some groups such as Premillenialists may argue.
  • II Corinthians 6:3 – If Paul had not lived what he preached, it would have reflected poorly on what he preached. The same is true for us.
  • II Corinthians 6:11-13 – The Corinthians were restrained by their own desires. Paul asks them to open their hearts to him and his teaching as he had opened his heart to them.  Many in the religious world today are in the same position of being restrained by their own desires.
  • II Corinthians 6:14-15 – See I Corinthians 5. This is not saying you can’t have dealings with unbelievers.  That would make it impossible to live in the world.  This is specifically talking about being tied to unbelievers in spiritual matters.
  • II Corinthians 6:16 – Christians are the temple of God.
  • II Corinthians 6:17 – Some try to apply this to marriage to advise against marrying an unbeliever, but marriage is not in the context.

2 Corinthians, Part 4

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By Jesse Jenkins

Benchley, March 1, 2017

  • II Corinthians 4:1-15
  • II Corinthians 4:1 – See Ephesians 3:4-9; 6:12. Heavenly places is referring to places of power (rulers on earth) – not Heaven itself.
  • II Corinthians 4:3-4 – The gospel was veiled to those who chose not to understand it. A parallel to this idea is Jesus speaking in parables.
  • II Corinthians 4:5 – “We” here could be used in the editorial sense, meaning only Paul, or it could be used to mean all the apostles.
  • II Corinthians 4:7 – The apostles were the only ones who had the treasure (the gospel) in earthen vessels (their bodies) to share with others. Paul is contrasting the greatness of the gospel with the relative lack of value of the vessel used to distribute it.
  • II Corinthians 4:8 – See II Corinthians 11:24-28. They were hard-pressed with persecution.
  • II Corinthians 4:12 – Paul was facing death daily to spread the gospel.

Good News About Jesus Christ

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By David Watson

Benchley, February 19, 2017

[Sorry, no notes available for this lesson.]

I Corinthians, Part 2

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By Jesse Jenkins

Benchley, June 1, 2016

  • I Corinthians 1:10-25
  • I Corinthians 1:10-17 – Paul appeals to them to stop calling themselves followers of particular men. Instead, they were to be unified as followers of Christ.  See also I Corinthians 3:4.
    • I Corinthians 1:17 – This is a “not-but” passage. Paul was sent to baptize, but that was not his primary goal.  His primary goal was to preach the gospel.  Only when someone hears and believes on their own will they be ready to be baptized.
  • I Corinthians 1:18-25 – Many people today still consider the gospel to be foolishness. God chose the message of the gospel to be foolishness to those who are wise in their own eyes.  We should not be surprised when that is the case.

Galatians, Part 1

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By Jesse Jenkins

Benchley, December 16, 2015

  • Galatians 1:1-12
  • The book of Galatians
    • Written about A.D. 57-58. The writer was Paul, but the author was the Holy Spirit.
    • Written to the churches in Galatia (Galatians 1:2).
  • Galatians 1:1 – Paul affirms that the source of the gospel he is preaching is heaven – not men.
  • Galatians 1:3 – This peace is not to come at all costs. In the Old Testament, God allowed the kingdom of Israel to be divided rather than have peace and unity in error.
  • Galatians 1:4 – The word “evil” here is translated from the Greek “πονηρός (ponēros),” which means “morally bad.”
  • Galatians 1:6-7 – Paul is using a play on words here with the words for “different” and “another” to strengthen his point that there is no other

By David Watson

Benchley, September 16, 2012