II Corinthians, Part 11

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By Jesse Jenkins

Benchley, April 26, 2017

  • II Corinthians 9:8-15
  • II Corinthians 9:12 – Paul repeatedly states that the funds are specifically for relieving needy saints. There was a definite limit to the scope of the benevolence. It was directed only to the needy Christians in Jerusalem.
  • II Corinthians 9:13 – The benevolence served two purposes: relieving needy Christians and cementing the relationship between Jewish Christians and Gentile Christians.

II Corinthians, Part 10

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By Jesse Jenkins

Benchley, April 12, 2017

  • II Corinthians 8:15-9:15
  • II Corinthians 8:16-22 – It was important that someone very trustworthy went along to handle the money to prevent suspicion of wrongdoing.
  • II Corinthians 8:19 – The money was specifically earmarked for helping needy saints, but the real purpose of giving was to glorify God.
  • II Corinthians 8:24 – Paul had already boasted about their love and generosity, so now they had to follow through.
  • II Corinthians 9:6-7 – Giving is equated to sowing seed. If you sow much, you will reap much. Therefore, give much and do so cheerfully. We are not to give out of compulsion. Some churches use this passage to compel their members to give more, but that is not an approach supported by scripture.

 

I Corinthians, Part 33

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By Jesse Jenkins

Benchley, February 1, 2017

  • I Corinthians 16:1-24
  • I Corinthians 16:1-2 – Paul directs the Christians to set aside and save as each prospers. This is specifically talking about some kind of pooled treasury because otherwise it would defeat Paul’s stated purpose at the end of verse 2:  “so that there be no collections when I come.”
    • Some argue that this collection was not to preach the gospel, which is true. These funds in this case were specifically earmarked for benevolence.  Other scriptures tell us the treasury can be used for other needs, but this is the only passage that tells us how to get the money into the treasury.
  • I Corinthians 16:8-9 – Paul had found great opportunities for teaching in Ephesus. See Acts 19.
  • I Corinthians 16:23-24 – This is the best that we can wish for Christians anywhere.

By Jesse Jenkins

Benchley, May 25, 2016

  • Discussion on how a church uses its money:
    • Philippians 4:15-16
    • In the New Testament, benevolence is sent church to church. Support to preach the gospel is sent directly to the receiving preacher.

 

By Jesse Jenkins

Benchley, May 22, 2016

  • Acts 24:17
  • In benevolence?
    • Provide livelihood for its own needy members (Acts 4:34-35; 6:1-6)
    • Send alms to another church that has more needy members than it can relieve so it can provide livelihood for its own needy members. I Corinthians 16:1-2; Romans 15:25-32; II Corinthians 8-9
    • The New Testament pattern is for one church to send money directly to another needy church. The elders of the receiving church are to disburse the funds.
    • Churches are not authorized in the New Testament to set themselves up as sponsoring churches so that they can collect money from many churches to use for benevolence.
    • Widow indeed (I Timothy 5:16)
  • In evangelism?
    • Philippians 4:15
    • Not sending money to another church so they can support preachers.
    • Send wages directly to the evangelist to provide his family’s livelihood (1 Corinthians 9:5:14; Philippians 4:15-16; 2 Corinthians 11:8-9)
    • Preachers should be supported for their work. I Corinthians 9:5-14
  • When money is given to a needy member to supply his livelihood, the scripture calls it alms.
  • When money is given to an evangelist to supply his livelihood, the scripture calls it wages.
  • It used to be common practice for a church to supply a house for the preacher as part of his wages.
  • Several times in the past, Benchley has sent one-time additional support to preachers for temporary needs they had.

Galatians, Part 11

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By Jesse Jenkins

Benchley, February 24, 2016

  • Galatians 6:1-18
  • Galatians 6:10 – Note that the context here does not include benevolence. The context concerns helping those who are caught in a trespass.  We are to help all that we encounter that are struggling with sin, but especially fellow Christians.
  • Galatians 6:11 – Some try to argue that Paul had large handwriting, indicating poor eyesight, but there is not much support for this. The Greek word translated “letter(s)” here means document, letter, or written law, which seems to indicate that Paul was referring to his volume of writing.

Galatians, Part 2

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By Jesse Jenkins

Benchley, December 23, 2015

  • Galatians 1:13-2:10
  • Galatians 1:15 – Some believe that this verse is stating that God chose Paul from birth to preach to the Gentiles. It is possible that Paul is just using worshipful language of God.  See Acts 9:1-16.  God’s calling came to Paul later in life, but He did call Paul specifically to preach to the Gentiles.
  • Galatians 1:19 – James, the Lord’s brother was not one of the original 12 apostles. The word “apostle” just means one who is chosen and sent.  In this sense, James was an apostle in the same sense as Paul.
  • Galatians 2:2 – Paul compared the gospel he was preaching to what Peter, James, and John were preaching (see Galatians 2:9) and found they were in complete agreement.
  • Galatians 2:5 – Paul did not tolerate false teaching at all. He stood up to them and refuted their teaching.
  • Galatians 2:10 – Some try to use this passage to prove that the church should practice unlimited benevolence. The context, however, is preaching.  Peter, James, and John wanted Paul to make sure to bring the gospel to the poor.  Even if this passage is talking about benevolence, Paul was the one being instructed to do so – not the church!

By David Watson

Benchley, November 22, 2015

  • II John 9
  • I Corinthians 14:23
  • Because we don’t have Bible authority for it.
    • II John 9 – We don’t want to go outside the teaching of Christ.
    • Galatians 1:8; Colossians 3:17
    • What local churches did in the New Testament
      • Churches provided for the teaching and preaching of the gospel.
        • Philippians 4:14-18
      • Churches provided for worship and spiritual edification.
        • I Corinthians 16:1-2; 14:26; 11:17-22, 33-34
      • Churches provided for needy Christians.
        • Acts 4:32-35; 6:1-4
        • See a pattern? Acts 2:44-45; 4:32-35; 6:1-3; 11:27-30; Romans 15:25-26; I Corinthians 16:1-3; II Corinthians 8, 9; I Timothy 5:16, 5
        • Were there no other needy people in Jerusalem – just Christians? There were, but that was outside the scope of the work of the church.
      • Because we have something better to offer!
        • Philippians 1:27 – This is what a church should be doing!
        • I Thessalonians 1:8
        • I Timothy 5:3-5, 16 – Churches are not to be distracted with lesser works. Families are obligated to help their own first.
        • Acts 6:2, 4
        • Individual Christians can and should be engaged in all kinds of good deeds! Luke 10:33-37; James 1:27
        • Jesus Himself helped so many people in both physical and spiritual ways, so why didn’t He authorize churches to help the world in physical ways? John 6:10-14, 24-35, 48-51.  Jesus came to serve a greater purpose than feeding people.

By Jesse Jenkins

Benchley, November 18, 2015

  • Lesson 8:
    • Introduction
      • When one obeys the gospel, he is added by the Lord to the church (Acts 2:47). He is then a “lively stone” (I Peter 2:5) in the “whole building fitly framed together unto the Lord” (Ephesians 2:21).  He should then become a member of a local church (Acts 9:26).  He then has certain responsibilities to the local church, and the local church has certain responsibilities to him.
    • Procedure by which one becomes a member of a local church:
      • The Lord does not add one to a local church.
      • One becomes a member by choice, i.e., by joining the local fellowship (Acts 9:26).
    • The purpose of a local church membership:
      • It is God’s arrangement for saints to have fellowship in the things Christ has authorized them to do together. (Acts 20:28; Philippians 1:1)
      • In it, members are to work and worship together in the things of Christ so that:
        • God will be glorified (I Corinthians 10:31; Ephesians 3:21)
        • Saints will be edified (Acts 20:28, 32; Colossians 3:16; Ephesians 5:19)
        • Sinners will be taught (Philippians 4:15-16)
        • Destitute saints will be relieved (Acts 4:32-35; 11:27-30)
        • Under some circumstances, to practice discipline on unruly members.

By Jesse Jenkins

Benchley, November 11, 2015

  • The church is to raise funds through the offerings of its members on the first day of the week. I Corinthians 16:1-2
  • The Lord’s Supper is to be taken on the first day of the week. Acts 20:7; Matthew 26:26-29
  • When we take the Lord’s Supper, we are proclaiming the Lord’s death until He comes again. I Corinthians 11:23-26
  • We must examine ourselves and take of the Supper in a worthy manner or we condemn ourselves. I Corinthians 11:27-29
  • The primary function assigned to the church is preaching the Word. Acts 6:2
  • The church is only authorized to carry out benevolent work if the local church has needy saints that are unavoidably destitute or if another local church has more needy saints than it can relieve. Benevolence is specifically authorized only for saints.
  • The word “church” is used in 3 senses in the Bible:
    • Local church
    • Universal church
    • The local church, specifically in its assembled state.
  • When fully organized, a local church has saints, elders, and deacons.