By David Watson

Benchley, January 17, 2018

  • Figures of speech, continued
    • When should we take a word or phrase figuratively? (continued)
      • When a literal understanding contradicts known facts or common sense
        • John 3:3
        • John 10:9 – Jesus obviously was not a physical door
        • Matthew 8:22; Luke 13:22
    • When should we NOT take a word or phrase figuratively?
      • When a literal understanding simply contradicts our beliefs
        • This is dishonest. We can’t say something is figurative simply because we don’t want to believe it.
    • Which is more accurate?
      • The Bible means what is says.
      • The Bible means what it means.
    • Simile
      • Psalms 1:3
      • I Peter 5:8
    • Metaphor
      • Matthew 7:15
      • Matthew 26:26, 28
      • Luke 13:32
      • John 2:19
      • John 3:3
      • John 6:35
      • John 8:12
      • John 10:7, 9, 11, 14
      • John 11:11
      • John 15:5
      • Ephesians 6:17
    • Anthropomorphisms
      • Genesis 8:21
      • Genesis 9:15
      • Exodus 31:18
      • Deuteronomy 11:12
      • Job 40:9
      • Psalms 130:2
      • Jeremiah 7:13
      • Hebrews 4:13
      • Genesis 6:5-7
    • Not-but (a Hebrew method of comparison, emphasizing one thing but not necessarily condemning the other)
      • Mark 2:17
      • Mark 9:37
      • John 6:27
      • I Corinthians 1:17
      • Philippians 2:4
      • I Timothy 1:9
      • I Timothy 2:12
      • II Timothy 1:9
      • Titus 3:5
      • James 5:12
      • I Peter 3:3-4
      • I John 3:18
    • Hyperbole
      • Deuteronomy 1:28
      • Mark 10:25
      • John 3:26
      • John 4:29
    • Parable
      • Matthew 13:3-8
      • Luke 15:3-7
      • Luke 15:8-10
      • Luke 15:11-32
    • Metonymy (refers to something indirectly by using a related noun)
      • Genesis 6:11
      • Matthew 3:5-6
      • Matthew 10:34
      • John 1:29
      • John 3:16
      • Romans 5:9
      • I Corinthians 7:1
      • I Corinthians 11:26
      • Galatians 6:12

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